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Wired LANs use Ethernet cables and network adapters. Even though two computers can in exchange be directly wired up to each other using an Ethernet crossover cables, all wired LANs in general terms are also required to have some central devices like hubs, switches or some sort to accommodate more computers.
For dial-up connections to the Internet, the computer hosting the modem must run internet connection sharing or something that is a similar software that can be shred with share connections

Re: wired vs wireless by FirdousFirdous, 02 Feb 2009 14:50

With regards to which network we should be using, as noticed the majority votes for the wireless network. although this type of may have high capacity of storage, however the server speed may be incredibly slow due to the mega bites provided by the server. It highly compatible therefore can be stored inform of devices such as laptops mobile phones. It can be taken around everywhere. This leads to another topic about the Wifi which is also a commonly used network that uses radio instead of wired to broadcast between information systems. Which one is to be favoured, the wireless or the Wifi, as they are both used in open space and can be accessed from all angles from wherever you are with a multiple of users. It can be debatable as to which one is at advantage when in contrast to each other. Wifi has greater speed,, when in comparison to Bluetooth.

Re: wired vs wireless by Aisha87Aisha87, 02 Feb 2009 14:30

Has anybody heard of the powerline way of connecting to a network? For the people out there who have wanted to create a network but the thought of wires around the house put them off, there is now the option to connect to the home network through the homes powerline. You basically have one device which plugs in the wall socket and attaches an ethernet cable from the device to the router. You can then plug 2 more powerline devices anywhere in the house and connect the ethernet cable anything (computers, laptops, PS3, Xbox 360)
I have personally used this device on the PS3 online and found that it was a great invention and way of connecting to the network effortlessly and without annoying cables. However, saying that I did also find that when many demanding electric devices were running at the same times, at times you would be disconnected from the Internet.
It doesnt take a genius to set it up and can be bought for about £35 - £60

What do you think of this creation? Would YOU use it?

Powerline Ethernet by zah1dzah1d, 02 Feb 2009 14:30

Has anybody heard of the powerline way of connecting to a network? For the people out there who have wanted to create a network but the thought of wires around the house put them off, there is now the option to connect to the home network through the homes powerline. You basically have one device which plugs in the wall socket and attaches an ethernet cable from the device to the router. You can then plug 2 more powerline devices anywhere in the house and connect the ethernet cable anything (computers, laptops, PS3, Xbox 360)
I have personally used this device on the PS3 online and found that it was a great invention and way of connecting to the network effortlessly and without annoying cables. However, saying that I did also find that when many demanding electric devices were running at the same times, at times you would be disconnected from the Internet.
It doesnt take a genius to set it up and can be bought for about £35 - £60

What do you think of this creation? Would YOU use it?

Powerline Ethernet by zah1dzah1d, 02 Feb 2009 14:29

Wired networks are more reliable because there is less chance of interference compared to wireless networks. However, wired networks can cost a lot to maintain because of the cables and hardware. In addition, in the wireless networks, all that is needed is a wireless router and wireless technology in the PC or laptops. Currently most laptops come with inbuilt wireless cards and so do PC’s. Wireless cards can be purchased for reasonable prices and once connected do not need to be replaced due to wear and tear while cables do. Wireless networks are easier to set up and when it comes to security, depending on the router security access can be set up. This means no outsiders can access the network without a password key.

Re: wired vs wireless by Saheel KalaiyaSaheel Kalaiya, 02 Feb 2009 13:02

I guess guys I agree with you on the fact that wireless is far better that wired…as the advantages to that is that it is cost effective- in the sense that Buying and installing structured Ethernet networking cables into your home can be a costly exercise. Setting up a basic wireless home network can cost significantly less. Secondly, portable and flexible- Wireless networking devices from NETGEAR enable you to use your computer, laptop or games console anywhere in the house and be on the network or get access to the Internet. Even if you have a large house, wireless signal will generally go through walls and ceilings. If you need to extend distances you can use access points to boost the wireless signal. Finally, its Neat and safe- If you choose to set-up a wireless home network you do not need to run cables across your house, I guess that’s a good thing as it can create trip hazards across rooms, hallways and stairs. Also for all us modern tidy freaks, choosing to set-up a wireless home network means that you do not need to run cables underneath carpets or drill holes through walls or ceilings to pass cables through.
On the other hand the good thing to being wired is that it is a lot faster, reliable and secure than wireless!

Re: wired vs wireless by FirdousFirdous, 02 Feb 2009 12:44

As it has already been stated on the wiki that wired connected networks are cheaper and safer around the home however can be time consuming and difficult for novice users to setup rather then a wireless network. Furthermore, wireless connections are more flexible and cleaner and tidy then a wired network. In addition, wireless networks may have a few drawbacks such as security and radio interference, however these can be overcome. Firstly a wireless network can be secured by many by Encryption, WPA, WEP and also by having a firewall which can also help secure the network. Overall I feel that wireless networks are a better way to create a network because it is much more easier to add computers or laptops on the network has been created and without the hassle of many wires which can be dangerous in a home environment.

Re: wired vs wireless by azam aslamazam aslam, 02 Feb 2009 10:35

Wired connections are faster and more secure than wireless connections. For this reason I have always been a fan of wired networks. It is not overly expensive to set up as you can buy wire and make lan cables yourself. You can also get a network switch for less than 15 pounds. In my house there are three desktops, two laptops(wired) and two X-Box 360's all in different rooms and it cost less than £25 punds to set up the wired network.

Re: wired vs wireless by RobbieMillsRobbieMills, 01 Feb 2009 18:47

I personally agree with the above to be fair wired would most likely provide a steady, fast connection. However it would most definitely be time consuming and expensive to have this if one was to have so many devices to connect to.

I personally have a wireless connection and prefer it to the old connection I had which was wired due to the fact that it offers many advantages. Such as being able to be anywhere in the house rather than in one place attached to a wire.

Re: wired vs wireless by sabella1sabella1, 31 Jan 2009 20:31

I agree with the second poster. Although you more likely to have a steady and strong connection with a wired Ethernet connection it's just not as feasible as it was about 10 years ago. That's due to the fact that practically everything connects to the internet now and you'd have to have a multitude of cables and hubs around the house which isn't only more expensive to set up but more time consuming too.

The other gripe with hosting a wireless network is it lacks the security guaranteed by Ethernet, although this may not be a big deal for home users (most likely all the user is likely to lose is bandwidth due to someone piggy backing on their network) but coupling that with the increased reliability and you can see why it is a much more desirable set-up for businesses.

Re: wired vs wireless by JScottOJScottO, 31 Jan 2009 00:58

In attempting to outline whether the wired network or wireless network is the most appropriate for use in the home, it is essential that the issues of usability, storage/space, and maintenance are easily overcome. Generally wired networks require persons to fit wires thus creating unnecessary mess, and looking tacky especially in the home; even though this would create a faster connection with very few technical problems, there are huge costs that are attributed to this. The wired connection would best suit the commercial premises where faster connections are detrimental to the performance of the company. On the other hand wireless connections are a cost efficient way for any household to achieve faster connections, achieving closer to that ultimate goal of speeds as fast as the wired/ Ethernet connection. Wireless connections, do not use the space or create the mess as would the wired connection “so no kids are tripping over loose wires” however the user pays for this through the speed of the connection. Conclusively the best connection for a home would be wireless and hence leaving the wired/Ethernet connection to be most advantageous for the business sector.

Re: wired vs wireless by Aisha87Aisha87, 29 Jan 2009 19:13

Although the general idea of wireless is far more appealing to the general public and businesses, the practicality of using an Ethernet cable makes far more sense in my eyes, even though I currently have a Playstation 3, 2 desktop PC’s, 2 laptops and printer on my wireless connection. The amount of times my wireless signal has been significantly reduced when trying to use more than two peripherals is ridiculous. As stated in your wiki once you lose your connection completely then you need to thoroughly check the wireless router and may need to ring your ISP to check whether there is a connection issue or not. Whereas if you where to use a wired connection and your peripheral is unable to connect to the internet then you know that there is either a problem with the ISP or the Ethernet cable is faulty. Although wireless technologies are vastly improving, my opinion is that until your connection through wireless can be as quick or reliable than an Ethernet cable then Ethernet will always be more practical, even if it means having masses of cables running around your home.

wired vs wireless by Danny GowingDanny Gowing, 29 Jan 2009 15:34

The wiki is looking good guys, but rememmber who your audience is. Focus on the people in our class, and tell them what they need to know. If you dilute your content with statements of the obvious (obvious to our class, that is) then you are using up your 1500 words with content that doesn't get the best marks.

An editor's big red pen is evry publisher's friend.

Editor's big red pen by ssmethurstssmethurst, 15 Jan 2009 13:46

Three reasons why Linux is best

(1) Microsoft = corporate greed
(2) Linux doesn't catch a cold
(3) Linux has superior network tools

I use Linux on all my home machines, partly becuase of my dislike for corporate Microsoft, and partly because it is an excellent OS. I find a great advantage to linux for home networking is that I don't need to maintain antivirus software. My desktop computer is on and connected to the Internet 24/7, and it has never caught a virus in the five years I have run Linux exclusively.

The way I use my home network involves a lot of ssh vnc and ftp. To do this in windoze I would have to install extra software, and would still not have as good functionality; Linux virtual desktops work great with VNC and windows terminal server cannot replace Linux's X-over-ssh.

For Linux, networking comes natural. For windoze, networking is an add-on.

Re: operating systems by ssmethurstssmethurst, 15 Jan 2009 13:41

easier to set up with windows harder with linux but better network

operating systems by azam aslamazam aslam, 15 Dec 2008 13:19
Re: welcome
azam aslamazam aslam 11 Dec 2008 18:45
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » welcome

welcome to the post

Re: welcome by azam aslamazam aslam, 11 Dec 2008 18:45
welcome
azam aslamazam aslam 09 Dec 2008 19:55
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » welcome

welcome to the post on home networking

welcome by azam aslamazam aslam, 09 Dec 2008 19:55
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